stirring up the meltingpot

My love for eating and the right presentation of food, has led me to the art of ceramics. I've collected dishes and other ceramics ever since I began traveling the world as a fashion model. I started designing my own pottery after enrolling in a ceramics class some 15 years ago. I am inspired by archeological finds and tribal art.
You can check out some of my work on ETSY
http://www.etsy.com/shop/MarielleMacville
http://www.facebook.com/mariellemacvilleceramics
ancientart:

Ancient Persian vessel in form of a doe, excavated in the region near Amlash in northwestern Iran.1000-900 BC, made of molded earthenware.
Courtesy & currently located at the Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio, USA. Photo taken by ellenm1.

ancientart:

Ancient Persian vessel in form of a doe, excavated in the region near Amlash in northwestern Iran.1000-900 BC, made of molded earthenware.

Courtesy & currently located at the Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio, USA. Photo taken by ellenm1.

blueberrymodern:

kako katsumi
picasso drawing with light

picasso drawing with light

artnet:

Picasso’s Owl
This charming plate by Spanish master Pablo Picasso features a round, voluminous owl on a starry background. Created during a Summer spent at the French Riviera, the plate bears a Madoura stamp and Edition Picasso Madoura on the underside. 
Click through to discover more of Picasso’s breathtaking ceramics. 

artnet:

Picasso’s Owl

This charming plate by Spanish master Pablo Picasso features a round, voluminous owl on a starry background. Created during a Summer spent at the French Riviera, the plate bears a Madoura stamp and Edition Picasso Madoura on the underside. 

Click through to discover more of Picasso’s breathtaking ceramics

(via thomortiz)

the-pool:

fenandned.com
centuriespast:

Mother Goddess
3rd Century BC, Mauryan Period
Place of origin: Mathura, Uttar Pradesh
National Museum, India

centuriespast:

Mother Goddess

3rd Century BC, Mauryan Period

Place of origin: Mathura, Uttar Pradesh

National Museum, India

(via tumbleword)

artnet:

Opening at Zwirner
David Zwirner is debuting a new show of work early work by American ceramicist Robert Arneson this week. 
Closely associated with the countercultural California Funk movement of the 1960s, Arneson was instrumental in elevating ceramics from mere craft to a valid form of aesthetic expression. A ceramics teacher at University of California’s Davis campus, the artist’s ceramics studio became a focal point of artistic exchange and his students, including Bruce Nauman, would often stay there late into the night. 
Don’t miss the opening reception tonight from 6-8pm, at David Zwirner’s 537 West 20th Street space. 

artnet:

Opening at Zwirner

David Zwirner is debuting a new show of work early work by American ceramicist Robert Arneson this week. 

Closely associated with the countercultural California Funk movement of the 1960s, Arneson was instrumental in elevating ceramics from mere craft to a valid form of aesthetic expression. A ceramics teacher at University of California’s Davis campus, the artist’s ceramics studio became a focal point of artistic exchange and his students, including Bruce Nauman, would often stay there late into the night. 

Don’t miss the opening reception tonight from 6-8pm, at David Zwirner’s 537 West 20th Street space. 

(Source: chavaya)

ruth duckworth

ruth duckworth

biff:

Christja Tritschler

ceramicsresearch:

Ruth Duckworth

Beautiful Stoneware + Porcelain works. Love the use of simple forms brought together to create quiet but powerful compositions, often with delicate line detail. Clean, simple.

(via thomortiz)

artpropelled:

Ruth Duckworth in her studio

artpropelled:

Ruth Duckworth in her studio

(via thomortiz)

renaissancesociety:

With William J. O’Brien’s 100+ ceramic sculpture opening reception coming up this Sunday, we look at some past ceramic sculptors The Renaissance Society has shown.  Here, Ruth Duckworth, who had a solo exhibition at The Renaissance Society in 1965 titled Stoneware. 

renaissancesociety:

With William J. O’Brien’s 100+ ceramic sculpture opening reception coming up this Sunday, we look at some past ceramic sculptors The Renaissance Society has shown.  Here, Ruth Duckworth, who had a solo exhibition at The Renaissance Society in 1965 titled Stoneware

(via thomortiz)

twistednuns:

Lucie Rie working
Lucie Rie was born on March 6, 1902 to a prominent family in Vienna. In 1922 she entered the Kunstgewerbeschule, a school of arts and crafts associated with the Wiener Werkstätte, where she was, she said, instantly ‘”lost” to the potter’s wheel. She developed quickly, combining a taste for a clean, modernist aestetic with daring technical skill.
In 1926, she married and commissioned an apartment from a young Viennese architect, Ernst Plischke, on Andreasgasse. Lucie had purchased a chair from Plischke and like it so much that she asked him to furnish her entire apartment. It was his first commission. Plischke designed every detail of the flat to suit the young potter, including studio space with a gas-fired kiln and, in the living room, walnut cupboards with versatile shelves that could be rearranged to display her work. When Lucie fled to London in 1938, she had the entire interior shipped over and re-erected in a mews house in Bayswater, where she lived and worked, to great renown, for the next 50 years. After she passed, the studio was moved and reconstructed again, this time in the Victoria and Albert Museum‘s ceramics gallery.
Lucie is often described as steely and too rigorous to be a good teacher, though she had a lasting mentorship turned creative partnership with Hans Coper and always made time to meet with anyone with a serious interest in pottery. Those who qualified for her time were invited over to her studio for tea, cake, and serious conversation, so long as it wasn’t technical talk about pottery.

twistednuns:

Lucie Rie working

Lucie Rie was born on March 6, 1902 to a prominent family in Vienna. In 1922 she entered the Kunstgewerbeschule, a school of arts and crafts associated with the Wiener Werkstätte, where she was, she said, instantly ‘”lost” to the potter’s wheel. She developed quickly, combining a taste for a clean, modernist aestetic with daring technical skill.

In 1926, she married and commissioned an apartment from a young Viennese architect, Ernst Plischke, on Andreasgasse. Lucie had purchased a chair from Plischke and like it so much that she asked him to furnish her entire apartment. It was his first commission. Plischke designed every detail of the flat to suit the young potter, including studio space with a gas-fired kiln and, in the living room, walnut cupboards with versatile shelves that could be rearranged to display her work. When Lucie fled to London in 1938, she had the entire interior shipped over and re-erected in a mews house in Bayswater, where she lived and worked, to great renown, for the next 50 years. After she passed, the studio was moved and reconstructed again, this time in the Victoria and Albert Museum‘s ceramics gallery.

Lucie is often described as steely and too rigorous to be a good teacher, though she had a lasting mentorship turned creative partnership with Hans Coper and always made time to meet with anyone with a serious interest in pottery. Those who qualified for her time were invited over to her studio for tea, cake, and serious conversation, so long as it wasn’t technical talk about pottery.